A quirky new celebs 'rulebook for life' has been released that’s literally DESIGNED - to be ripped up - digitalhub

A quirky new celebs ‘rulebook for life’ has been released that’s literally DESIGNED – to be ripped up – digitalhub

The limited-edition book features negative advice given to a host of entrepreneurs and musicians at the beginning of their careers – which would have held them back if they’d paid any attention to it.
 
The book, which asks for the reader to destroy it, contains contributions from business rebels like the soon-to-be youngest-ever investor on BBC’s Dragon’s Den, Steven Bartlett.
 
Other personalities to appear in the book, compiled by Smokehead whisky, include rapper Professor Green, comedian Adam Rowe and photographer Martina Martian.
 
The quotes are designed to be ripped out of the book and set alight to ‘smoke rinse’ cocktail glasses, allowing the drinker to raise a rebellious toast to those who take risks.
 
Professor Green – aka Stephen Manderson – grew up on a council estate in east London, before going on to become a multi-platinum artist, and then diversifying into other creative businesses.
 
He was often told ‘a bad idea is better than no idea’ but knew that was never right for him.
 
Instead, he prefers to leave the studio with a blank piece of paper rather than produce work for the sake of it – and he’ll never launch anything new unless he knows it’s excellent.
 
He said: “I’ve been told plenty of times just to make something and that it doesn’t matter if it’s not totally perfect.
 
“That might be good advice for some, but it doesn’t work for me.
 
“Some people think that a blank page is your worst enemy – imagine a painter with a blank canvas fearing their first stroke – but the challenge of walking into a studio with no idea for a song and having to come up with one is what spurs me on.
 
“Reading the book, I can relate to plenty of the other comments – I think anyone who has fire in their belly will too.”
 

 
Steven Bartlett wanted to leave university to start his own business but was told ‘quitting is for losers’.
 
At the age of 18, he did it anyway and is now running one of the world’s most influential social media companies with a current market valuation of more than £300m.
 
He now hosts Europe’s most popular business podcast, is a best-selling author and will replace Tej Lalvani on Dragon’s Den when it returns for its 19th series on BBC1 later this year.
 
Mikey Sim, Ambassador for Smokehead whisky, which compiled the book, said: “Every contributor to our book has trusted their gut over guidance.
 
“They come from different backgrounds and are known for different things – but it’s that mindset that connects them together and it’s one we share.
 
“With this book, we hope to inspire more rebels and game-changers by encouraging them to believe in themselves above all else.
 
“We created Smokehead because we refuse to believe that you need to ‘earn your stripes’ to enjoy a peated whisky.
 
“We’re not interested in the usual etiquette – ours is an award-winning single malt, but people should drink it however they like.
 
“With this book, we can’t wait to see the rules literally being ripped up.”
 
The book is available to buy from Monday at https://www.smokehead.com/
 
THE SMOKEHEAD RULEBOOK CONTRIBUTORS AND THEIR IGNORED ADVICE:
 
“Just stick to what you know”: Photographer Martina Martian was a successful illustrator who decided to try something different. Traveling the world for a year, she picked up a camera and now shoots for some of the biggest brands and magazines in the world
 
“Better to make a great living doing something you hate, than a decent one doing something you love”: Comedian Adam Rowe ditched his maths degree for a life of stand-up and is now one of the most sought-after names in British comedy
 
“Be grateful for what you’ve got. Stop pushing for more”: Pro-skateboarder, Stefani Nurding wanted the world of skateboarding to be more welcoming of women. So, she kickstarted it herself by starting her own business designed to make the sport accessible and desirable for girls.
 
“Soften your sound. Simplify the riffs. Scream a little less”: Alternative rock duo, Nova Twins are black, female with big punk attitude. They don’t fit the mould – and they don’t care.
 
“You need to stop and go get yourself a real job”: Director and content creator, Roony Keefe aka Risky Roadz is a visionary of the grime scene, filming hours of rappers including Wiley, Kano and Skepta to create a ground-breaking documentary
 
“You can dream, but keep it realistic”: Musician, Billy Nomates was in band after band in her twenties, none of which made it big. She stuck to her dream, released her own album and has been described as one of the “most distinctive new voices in British music”
 
“You will never make any money in art”: Tattoo artist, Nikole Lowe has worked in the industry for over 30 years, runs one of London’s most famous studios and her art is worn by thousands of bodies around the globe
 
“Don’t take unnecessary risks. Run your business on the side”: Founder of Crepe City, Ronal Raichura was told his side hustle could never be anything more. He gave it his full focus and now it’s the largest and most popular sneaker festival in the country.
 
“You’re not supposed to enjoy your work”: Award-winning chef and restauranteur, Neil Rankin ditched his corporate 9-to-5 to follow his heart. He founded Temper, one of the world’s biggest restaurant fire pits and now pioneers sustainable and satisfying plant-based meat
 
“Don’t do anything crazy”: Smokehead ambassador Mikey Sim has never stuck by the rules – and that includes how he pours his whisky. He constantly innovates with the single malt and the ways in which it’s served.

  

Source link

Total
0
Shares
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Previous Article

Global Ultrasound System Market Top Industry Expansion Strategies and Segments 2021-2028

Next Article
More than half of all shoppers would be happy to pay 19 per cent more for food items made with British ingredients

More than half of all shoppers would be happy to pay 19 per cent more for food items made with British ingredients

Related Posts